Biochemistry and Histology

July 22, 2019

General Information
Duration 1 semester
Level Year 1, Semester 1
Unit Weighting Unit Credit Points: 10 credit points
Total Course Credit Points: 320 credit points
Student Workload Number of timetabled hours per week: 4
Number of personal study hours per week: 6
Total workload hours per week: 10
Prerequisites None
Academic Details
Description This unit introduces students to biochemistry and histology.
Biochemistry provides students with an understanding of biochemical reactions in the human body. This includes the structures and functions of proteins and enzymes, the bioenergetics and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids, and the metabolism of proteins, amino acids and nucleic acids. It also addresses the role of minerals and vitamins, the function of hormones in extracellular and intracellular communication, the structure of the genetic code, the mechanisms of gene expression and regulation and gene replication and repair.
Histology equips students with the knowledge of basic microscopic anatomy, the structure and function of tissues, glands and membranes, epithelial and muscular tissue, connective tissues, the characteristics of cells and tissues of the circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, nervous system, reproductive system, and urinary system.
Learning outcomes On successful completion of this unit students will be able to:
Biochemistry
a. Explain the synthesis and functions of proteins and enzymes.
b. Describe how various cellular reactions utilise or produce energy and the pathways by which carbohydrates are synthesised and degraded, the metabolism of amino acids and how this yields energy.
c. Describe the synthesis and functions of nucleic acids and their role, mechanisms of DNA organisation and replication, RNA synthesis, processing and metabolism, the structure of hormones and explain their key role.
Histology
d. Explain the structure and function of tissues, glands and membranes.
e. Describe the conceptual framework and terms of reference for the identification and description of epithelial, connective, and muscular tissues.
f. Describe the conceptual framework and terms of reference for the identification and description of the cell and tissue characteristics of the circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, nervous system, reproductive system and urinary system.
Assessment Biochemistry Quiz (15%)
Biochemistry Final Examination (Open-Book) (25%)
Histology Quiz (25%)
Histology Final Examination (Open-Book) (35%)
Prescribed Texbooks/Readings * The prescribed and recommended readings are subject to annual review.

Bass, J. (2012) Circadian topology of metabolism, Nature, 491:348-56.

Chatterjee, A., Komshian, S., Sansbury, B. E., Wu, B., Mottola, G., Chen, M., … Conte, M. S. (2017). Biosynthesis of proresolving lipid mediators by vascular cells and tissues. FASEB Journal, 31(8), 3393-3202. doi: 10.1096/fj.201700082R

Hayden, E.C. (2016) Tomorrow’s children, Nature, 530:402-5.

Kemp, M. (2003) The Mona Lisa of modern science, Nature, 421:416-20.

Kim, J.W. & Dang, C.V. (2006) Cancer’s Molecular Sweet Tooth and the Warburg Effect, Cancer Research, 66(18):8927-30.

Nelson, D.L., & Cox, M.M. (2017). Lehninger principles of biochemistry (7th ed.). New York: W.H. Freeman and Company.

Ovalle, William K (2013). Netter’s essential histology (2nd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier/Saunders.
Owens, B. (2014) The changing colour of fat, Nature, 508:S52-3.

Reglodi, D., Kiss, P., Horvath, G., Lubics, A., Laszlo, E., Tamas, A., … Szakaly, P. (2012). Effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide in the urinary system, with special emphasis on its protective effects in the kidney. Neuropeptides, 46(2), 61-70. doi: 10.1016/j.npep.2011.05.001

Sujino, T., London, M., Konijnenburg, D., Rendon, T., Buch, T., Silva, H., Mucida, D. (2016). Tissue adaptation of regulatory and intraepithelial CD4+ T cells controls gut inflammation. Science, 352(6), 1581-1586. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf3892

Zuker, C.S. (2015) Food for the Brain, Cell, 161:9-11.