Channels & Points 1

July 22, 2019

General Information
Duration 1 semester
Level Year 1, Semester 2
Unit Weighting Unit Credit Points: 10 credit points
Total Course Credit Points: 320 credit points
Student Workload Number of timetabled hours per week: 4
Number of personal study hours per week: 6
Total workload hours per week: 10
Prerequisites HMS101 Human Anatomy 1; TCM113 Fundamental Theory of TCM & TCM Terminology
Academic Details
Description This unit and ACU202 Channels and Points 2 introduce students to the theory and practice of Channels and Points in Chinese medicine. A total of 400 acupuncture points is studied over the two units (ACU107 and ACU202).
This unit provides a comprehensive foundation in the composition and functions of the Channels and Points of the Governing Vessel (Du Mai), Conception Vessel (Ren Mai), Lung Channel, Large Intestine Channel, Stomach Channel, Spleen Channel, Heart Channel and Small Intestine Channel. Study during this unit includes the distributions of Channels, the names and numbering of acupuncture points, their locations, their classifications and their therapeutic functions and clinical indications. Students also explore the significance of the Primary Channels, the Divergent Channel, the Collateral Channel, the Sinew Channel and the Cutaneous region of each channel.
Learning outcomes On successful completion of this unit students will be able to:
a. Outline the history, development, compositions and functions of the Channel and Collateral System, the distribution and connection of each of the various components of the system, and procedures of safe acupuncture practice.
b. Compare the course of channels and points of the Governing Vessel (Du Mai), Conception Vessel (Ren Mai), Lung Channel, Large Intestine Channel, Stomach Channel, Spleen Channel, Heart Channel and Small Intestine Channel.
c. Define the theory of acupuncture points, including their name/number, location, features, actions/indications, cautions and contraindications.
d. Explain the significance of the symptoms and signs associated with disorders of the Channels and Collaterals.
e. Demonstrate palpatory techniques and method of proportional measurement, privacy respect, and awareness of cultural sensitivity in the acupuncture practice in a supervised simulated setting.
Assessment Mock Practical Test (5%)
Short Answer Questions (20%)
Practical Test (30%)
Final Examination (45%)
Prescribed Textbooks/Readings * The prescribed and recommended readings are subject to annual review.

Chinese Medicine Board of Australia. (2019, February 8). Infection prevention and control guidelines for acupuncture practice. https://www.chinesemedicineboard.gov.au/Codes-Guidelines/Infection-prevention.aspx

Deadman, P. A., Khafaji, M., & Baker, K. (2007). A manual of acupuncture (2nd ed.). Journal of Chinese Medicine Publications.

Fan, L. (2007). Role of the Du channel in treating senile dementia. The Journal of Chinese Medicine, 83, 67.

Liu, P., Wang, P., Tian, D., Liu, J., Chen, G., & Liu, S. (2012). Study on traditional Chinese medicine theory of lung being connected with large Intestine. Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 32(3), 482-487. doi: 10.1016/s0254-6272(13)60059-x

Luo, Q., Hu, Y., & Zhang, H. (2017). Effects of point massage of liver and stomach channel combined with pith and trotter soup on postpartum lactation start time. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 37(7), 872-876. doi: 10.1080/01443615.2017.1309366

Liu, P., Wang, P., Tian, D., Liu, J., Chen, G., & Liu, S. (2012). Study on traditional Chinese medicine theory of lung being connected with large intestine. Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 32(3), 482-487.