Practice Management & Professional Issues

August 11, 2015

General Information
Duration 1 semester (14 teaching weeks)
Level Year 4, Semester 8
Unit Weighting Unit Credit Points: 10 credit points
Total Course Credit Points: 320 credit points
Student Workload Number of timetabled hours per week: 4
Number of personal study hours per week: 6
Total workload hours per week: 10
Prerequisites/ Corequisites PRI 104 Communication in Health
Academic Details
Description Chinese medicine practitioners, especially entry-level practitioners, are required to adhere to professional, legal and statutory requirements to ensure safe TCM practice. This unit aims to instruct year four students on the current requirements and procedures involved in establishing and maintaining a private TCM practice, and on the values, conduct and attributes required of a professional practitioner.

In this unit of study students will explore the professional, legal, ethical, interpersonal, financial, organisational and registration issues that must be taken into account in professional practice; reflect on the responsibilities of registered practitioners in the Australian healthcare context; and discuss the importance of and identify the issues of safe and sensitive client care, workplace health and safety, infectious control procedures, and safe Chinese herbal medicine practice. This unit also gives an overview of medical sociology and also the principles and practice of public health in Australia. The desire to achieve excellence in the practice of acupuncture and/or Chinese herbal medicine and to contribute to improving both the quality of life of patients and the wellbeing of the community and the environment will be a key feature in the teaching and learning of this unit.

Students are encouraged to attend and participate in class activities including group discussion, case studies, presentations, and debates to achieve critical and deep learning.

Learning outcomes Upon completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Outline and explain the role of government regulation, registration bodies, professional associations, and practitioners’ responsibility relating to TCM practice.
  2. Develop working strategies in TCM clinical practice, in compliance with regulatory and professional requirements such as code of conduct, Chinese medicine registration standards, advertising guidelines, patient informed consent, confidentiality, patient health record, professional development, and health professional integration.
  3. Generate a business plan to apply business and financial concepts to establishment and management of a TCM practice.
  4. Design solutions to issues of safe Chinese medicine practice including client service, culture safety, necessary referring, workplace health and safety, infection control, herbal toxicity, and advert event reporting
  5. Identify and critically analyse controversial health care issues to make clinical decisions based on legal provisions and ethical theories and principles.
  6. Discuss and explain the theory and concept of introductory sociology and public health to advocate on behalf of patient and contribute to improving both the quality of life of patients and the wellbeing of the community.
Unit requirement To successfully complete the unit, students must: attend 80% of all the lectures and tutorial classes; attempt all assessment tasks and achieve at least 50% of the total marks, and achieve a mark of at least 40% in the final examination.
Assessment Assessment 1: Group Presentation (30%)

Assessment 2: Business Plan (30%)

Assessment 3: Final Examination (40%)

Prescribed text * The prescribed and recommended readings are subject to annual review.

Chinese Medicine Board of Australia. (2018). Codes and Guidelines. Retrieved from https://www.chinesemedicineboard.gov.au/Codes-Guidelines.aspx

Weir, M. (2016). Law and Ethics in Complementary Medicine: a handbook for practitioners in Australia and New Zealand (5th ed.). Allen & Unwin.

Recommended readings AHPRA. (2019). Titles in health advertising. Retrieved from https://www.ahpra.gov.au/Publications/Advertising-resources/Check-and-correct/Titles.aspx

Australia Government. (2018). Services from across government to support your business. Retrieved from https://www.business.gov.au/

Australia Government. (2019). Poisons Standard June 2019, 9 May 2019. Retrieved from https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2019L00685

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). (2018). Australia’s health 2018. Retrieved from https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/australias-health/australias-health-2018/contents/table-of-contents

Beauchamp, T. L. & Childress, J. F. (2012). Principles of Biomedical Ethics (Principles of Biomedical Ethics) (Seventh ed.) Oxford University Press, USA.

Carter, D., Vogan, A., & Haji Ali Afzali, H. (2016). Governments Need Better Guidance to Maximise Value for Money: The Case of Australia’s Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee. Appl Health Econ Health Policy, 14(4), 401-407. doi: 10.1007/s40258-015-0220-3

Cockerham, W. C. (2017). Medical sociology. Taylor & Francis.

Gillon R. (2015). Defending the four principles approach as a good basis for good medical practice and therefore for good medical ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 41:111-116.

Gillon R. (2015). Defending the four principles approach as a good basis for good medical practice and therefore for good medical ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 41:111-116.

Hornosty, J. M., & Germov, J. (2017). Second Opinion: An Introduction to Health Sociology. Oxford University Press.

Kerridge, I. H., Lowe, M., & Stewart, C. (2013). Ethics and law for the health professions (4th ed.). Annandale, N.S.W.: The Federation Press.

Lin, V., Smith, J., & Fawkes, S. (2014). Public Health Practice in Australia (2nd ed.). NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Magelssen, M., Pedersen, R., & Førde, R. (2016). Four roles of ethical theory in clinical ethics consultation. The American Journal of Bioethics, 16(9), 26-33.

Magelssen, M., Pedersen, R., & Førde, R. (2016). Four roles of ethical theory in clinical ethics consultation. The American Journal of Bioethics, 16(9), 26-33.

National Health and Medical Research Council. (2010). Australian Guidelines for the prevention and control of infection in healthcare. Retrieved from https://nhmrc.gov.au/about-us/publications/australian-guidelines-prevention-and-control-infection-healthcare-2010

TGA. (2018). Australian regulatory guidelines for complementary medicines (ARGCM). Retrieved from https://www.tga.gov.au/publication/australian-regulatory-guidelines-complementary-medicines-argcm.

TGA. (2018). Reporting adverse events. https://www.tga.gov.au/reporting-adverse-events